All posts tagged: art

If The People Have No Bread

Dear White Women in the Arts, Please continue eating cake in the corner with each other. I am using your Marie-Antoinette-havin-asses as something to look at while I stand in a group of boys clubs and discuss the new photographic prints which just came into The Gallery in large lead frames. Or, put your guns up and your cakes down, Ladies. (Source)

Louis Kahn @ FABRIC WORKSHOP MUSEUM

Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture August 11, 2017–November 5, 2017 Opening Reception: Wednesday, September 6, 2017, 6:00–8:00 pm The exhibit of Louis Kahn’s architectural career on the 8th floor of the Fabric Workshop Museum in Philly presents an obviously male gendered and white notion of city planning and priorities.  ‘A small boy walks through a city and sees something which will tell him what he wants to do his whole life . ‘ Ok, I will accept this premise with adjustments to the assumption of gender and race. Wondering, then, what I have seen which has told me what I want to do my (whole) life. One beginning note is that my (whole) life is a consummation of variant architectures and landscapes. The quote on the wall seems more applicable to one born and raised and died within the city. So, in order to consider its possibility, I will wonder within the context of my (whole) life in New York City. Then, specificity becomes necessary . I don’t believe I have seen much in Midtown …

Brooklyn Photographs : exhibit @ BRIC Arts Media

OPENING RECEPTION: Wednesday, September 6, 2017 ON VIEW: September 7 – October 29, 2017 CURATED BY: Elizabeth Ferrer   A photo by Max Kozloff in the center of this series is astonishing. A young Jamaican girl slouches in a gold woven chair set against a palm background. Her head rests against her couched elbow and she gazes just left of the cameras 3ye, much like how I look at someone without looking at them. Someone next to her sees or decides to acknowledge the camera. A young child reaches for something in a middle aged mans hands. The series reminds me of an artist Osiris.  The color palate is rich, the light is even, and the artist has not inserted himself into the details. V good.      Max Kozloff, The Pensive Girl, Brooklyn, 1993

Dear Tech Employee Making 6 Figures and Still Finding It Necessary to Steal Artwork:

I understand that your 9 to 6pm guarantee of making more money than you’re realistically worth given the extreme economic disparity in this country has you feeling impervious to the same moral system that governs most of us,   Allow me to remind you of the general code of ethics which has existed since the early centuries of patronage. Art-WORK requires time, train fare, and intelligence. It is impossible to support such intelligence and effort if we are not paid for our products and skills. Considering your relative cluelessness to the creative process,   I assume you imagine that I simply sit down with a quill pen and a fireplace by my side and begin constructing drawings on the hide of dead lambs from last summer. These constructions of mine are simple, the discomfort of a cramped hand is easily soothed by the touch of a woman with her arms draped across my leather chair or by the clink of ice cubes under a splash of desert liquor after dinner.   Allow me to break …

Re: The price of art/work

I assist classes at the printshop in Manhattan. My duties include gathering class materials, answering technical questions, and cleaning up after the class has finished. Tonight, after completing my tasks adequately for a Japanese Woodblock class, I settled myself in a corner and continued working on my own print which utilized the techniques taught in the workshop. As I was working, a student came to my corner and interrupted my drawing into soft ground to ask if I was paid to assist the instructor today. I put down my number whatever pencil, took out my headphones and spun in my stool to look at her. “No, I am not paid cash.” I said. “Oh, How Come You Get So Much Time To Work?” she asked. I assume she was bothered by my working on my own artwork, so I ignored her intrusion and politely informed her that “Class ended at 4:30, you are here because of the generosity of your instructor.” It was about 5. “You don’t work very hard,” she replied. SO I SAID LISTEN …

Power sanding panels with Marjorie Welish

Marjorie Welish hired me to sand 12 wood panels down from old paintings to new slabs she intends to paint on. Her work is concerned with a search for post-modern primary colors ; “what would be a post modern blue,’ she asks while we work together on the wood panels. The paintings I am sanding away are covered with black and white grids and areas of red, yellow, and blue paint. They are reminiscent of Mondrian’s color fields, interesting because of her use of shades; she has included two shades of red in one painting : I had an opportunity to briefly explain my practice to the artist, who quickly engaged me in conversation regarding the attentiveness of line. She referenced Hercules Seghers, who’s show of etchings just came down at the Metropolitan. “That man can think,” she says. ‘He is attentive to each line.’ I nod and tell her that “I find my attention comes and goes, I have areas drawn with a lot of focus and others where my mind wanders. I wonder, now, …

artist in focus

What themes or subjects are you currently addressing in your work? I am currently addressing narrow environment; exploring vertical space. A print is a subjective response to my experience of perpendicular architecture, to movement within upright bounds. What materials do you work with? I work with paper, ink, and copper plate. I am a printmaker. I use acid (ferric chloride) to alter the surface of the copper plate. I use grounds to control what areas of the plate are exposed to ferric. I draw line into hard ground using a steel needle. The plate is etched for a longer duration to achieve more density in the line. Rosin is used to create areas of tone. I prefer charbonnel inks, the grain is smaller. I usually print in black and blue ink, but I may add areas of color using rice paper glued to the printmaking sheet. This process is called chine collé, the glue is made from methyl cellulose. I do also take 35 mm film photographs and use objects from the negatives. What is …