All posts tagged: print

Dear Tech Employee Making 6 Figures and Still Finding It Necessary to Steal Artwork:

I understand that your 9 to 6pm guarantee of making more money than you’re realistically worth given the extreme economic disparity in this country has you feeling impervious to the same moral system that governs most of us,   Allow me to remind you of the general code of ethics which has existed since the early centuries of patronage. Art-WORK requires time, train fare, and intelligence. It is impossible to support such intelligence and effort if we are not paid for our products and skills. Considering your relative cluelessness to the creative process,   I assume you imagine that I simply sit down with a quill pen and a fireplace by my side and begin constructing drawings on the hide of dead lambs from last summer. These constructions of mine are simple, the discomfort of a cramped hand is easily soothed by the touch of a woman with her arms draped across my leather chair or by the clink of ice cubes under a splash of desert liquor after dinner.   Allow me to break …

Re: The price of art/work

I assist classes at the printshop in Manhattan. My duties include gathering class materials, answering technical questions, and cleaning up after the class has finished. Tonight, after completing my tasks adequately for a Japanese Woodblock class, I settled myself in a corner and continued working on my own print which utilized the techniques taught in the workshop. As I was working, a student came to my corner and interrupted my drawing into soft ground to ask if I was paid to assist the instructor today. I put down my number whatever pencil, took out my headphones and spun in my stool to look at her. “No, I am not paid cash.” I said. “Oh, How Come You Get So Much Time To Work?” she asked. I assume she was bothered by my working on my own artwork, so I ignored her intrusion and politely informed her that “Class ended at 4:30, you are here because of the generosity of your instructor.” It was about 5. “You don’t work very hard,” she replied. SO I SAID LISTEN …

Assisting Michael Krueger

I kicked a s s today assisting Michael Krueger on a series of woodblock prints at the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop. Michael is an artist from Kansas who works in printmaking, animation, painting and drawing. He is visiting New York to publish a series of prints with the shop. The images are drawings which have been lazar cut into woodblocks and printed in multiple colors on Kozo #8 rice paper. We are printing three small editions, which will be divided between the printshop and Michael and sold. The drawings feature references to artists in the canon of art history which Michael says he is taking ownership of by including in his own work. In one image, Lee Krazer stands in front of a portrait of Edvard Munch with a paintbrush dripping red paint. Simple drawings without backgrounds, the referents float in a color field. I began on Tuesday by coating the Kozo paper with a methyl-cellulose glue. One side is painted with the wet glue and left to dry on large …

artist in focus

What themes or subjects are you currently addressing in your work? I am currently addressing narrow environment; exploring vertical space. A print is a subjective response to my experience of perpendicular architecture, to movement within upright bounds. What materials do you work with? I work with paper, ink, and copper plate. I am a printmaker. I use acid (ferric chloride) to alter the surface of the copper plate. I use grounds to control what areas of the plate are exposed to ferric. I draw line into hard ground using a steel needle. The plate is etched for a longer duration to achieve more density in the line. Rosin is used to create areas of tone. I prefer charbonnel inks, the grain is smaller. I usually print in black and blue ink, but I may add areas of color using rice paper glued to the printmaking sheet. This process is called chine collé, the glue is made from methyl cellulose. I do also take 35 mm film photographs and use objects from the negatives. What is …

can i show you something

met with ambie abano after seeing a video of her printmaking. she works wth large wood blocks and carves bodies into the blocks. the blocks are printed on paper using a spoon, and some are printed on cloth. her work is displayed in the philippines, where she is from, and she says in the video her work is about confronting death. i showed her the image transfers i made on saturday night, this time working with a cutout of the shoecrab. the images are small versions of what will later be large prints. the shape of the crab on its side is printed on fine japanese paper, i believe leftover kozoshi from the image transfer class with golnar adili. ambie didn’t ask what the shapes were, but she suggested pronto plate lithography after i explained the image transfer process. she explained the sponging method to me, which i recognized from college, and suggested litho paper. I’m not sure what litho paper is… ‘do you like pattern,” she asked me after seeing my experiments. yes, i …

lLitograjafe

I just grained my first litho stone. It’s Thursday, December 1, raining tonight in New York. I’m at the Robert Blackburn Printshop on 39th and 8th avenue. We’re in the Garment district, surrounded by fabric shops. A group of four women are finishing a chine collé class with Nandini Chirimar. justin says these stones were Bob’s. This one is about 200 pounds. I sprinkle 80 grain on the rock. The color of the grain is metallic, like brass jewelry and small like the inside of hourglass. You sprinkle it onto the limestone and rotate the alligator across rok with a lot of force until the spinning disk grinds away The Image from Before. I worked it until 9 and then some. Made sure the surface was level and left a note. Signed it Anne